Who I Am

Photo by November Wild

When I Was Young

I was pretty shy- I blushed constantly and resisted it terribly, believing that it exposed me in some way. As a young adult, I rarely spoke my mind. I didn’t think anybody would like me if I did.

Being True

An eating disorder landed me in the hospital, and I learned – quite literally – that not speaking my truth could kill me, while voicing it set me free. It continues to even now. No matter how difficult, painful, or scary, when we face our truths they ultimately become our majesty. They are ours to author however we choose.

A New Direction

With attention, love, and (to be honest) a whole lot of counselling, I realized some important things. First, my voice matters. Moreover, the world needs my truth. And I realized this is was also true for others.Our experience is our power; it’s what we offer the world.
Transformative healing is possible – even inevitable – when we integrate all the parts of ourselves: the good, the bad, the scary, and the surprising.

What Remains

I see therapy as a coming home of sorts. T.S. Eliot once wrote:

“We shall not cease from exploration, and at the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.”

We can reclaim who we are. I still blush. Now when it happens, I choose to see it as a reflection of the shy, sensitive soul I’ve always been. I’ve integrated that truth with love.